Thursday, March 18, 2010

Unprecedented

Oh yippee! Howard "I Brokered the Canal Treaty" Baker and Jimmuh "Peanuts For Brains" Carter are complaining about the supposed lack of collegiality in the senate.

"The hard partisanship and division that now exists is unprecedented," Carter said.

Baker, from Tennessee, added that "collegiality is virtually nonexistent in the Senate now."

"You've got to have a decent respect for the other person's point of view. There's a fair chance he's right. And it appears that doesn't exist now," Baker said. "The idea of the benefit of the doubt appears to be missing."


Well let's set aside the idea that the hyperpartisan wrangling really is unprecedented. I don't believe it is, but even if this is the worst it's ever been, I'm more worried about a few other precedents being set here by "The Unprecedented President" himself:

  • Nowhere does the government, on any level, require the purchase of a product by the citizenry under pain of fines and possible jail time -- unless health care passes.


Yes, I know there is the niggling matter of auto insurance. But guess what? I don't have auto insurance, because I don't drive a car! Most people are intelligent enough to figure out that if you're in a little fender bender, it's a lot cheaper in the long run to pay out of pocket, if you get it fixed at all, so you can keep your insurance premiums from rising! Who knew that those auto insurers were every bit as evil as their health care counterparts?

  • The government has never, under either party's control, "deemed" an entire bill passed without a floor vote.
But what about all the tu quoque we've been hearing from the Democrats on this one? The constitutionality of using parliamentary maneuvers on amendments to bills is debatable and even somewhat suspect, but presidents don't sign amendments. They sign bills. And the Constitution is pretty plain on how that is to be done.

  • No political party has failed to move legislation with a solid filibuster-proof majority in both houses -- until now.
This is the most glaring precedent that makes Carter and Baker look like whining wusses to me. If you can have a sixty-vote majority in the Senate and still not be able to get anything done, the problem is clearly not with the opposition party.

"You've got to have a decent respect for the other person's point of view. There's a fair chance he's right. And it appears that doesn't exist now," Baker said. "The idea of the benefit of the doubt appears to be missing."


Good advice for the Democrats to heed in dealing with each other.

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